Linked In Job Search Just Got Simple. Put Your Profile To The 30 Second Test

I’ve found an application on Linked In that is certainly new to me. It makes the job search much easier and goes well beyond the usual way of responding to ads. As the name suggests, you get right inside the advertising company and the ad itself.
Linked In Jobs Insider enables you to easily see who you are connected with for any job posted not only on Linked In, but also Monster, CareerBuilder, HotJobs, Craigslist, SimplyHired, Dice, or Vault, and like all the best job search applications, it’s free!
The way it works is you download a discrete Linked In toolbar that has just two tabs. One enables you to either update your profile or share posts with links through your groups. The second tab gives you full navigation through the channel so you can go where you need quickly, as well as turning on the Job Insider application.

The application pops up as a small column on the side of the screen and enables you to search jobs by keyword. Once you are in to the keyword search you can narrow the search down as much as you want or need to in order to come up with the jobs you are really interested in.

The search options are when Company by name, when posted, location (country or city), job function, industry, level and experience so that you can really drill down.
The list of jobs returned includes not only Linked In jobs, but also the career sites listed above. That’s a lot of coverage and opportunities.

When you get in to an individual job opportunity you get to see the full job description and company profile as well as who posted the job with a link to their profile and in-mail option. You can apply direct via the company website or via Linked In, request an introduction to the person who posted the job via one of your connections if you are not already connected with them. That is lots of ways to connect and apply from one place.

In addition, the really funky bit is that you can see who you are connected with that already works there (they could become your referer or give you help in your application.)
You even get an e-bay’esque list of similar jobs you can apply for and then if it doesn’t float your boat, a list of your connections that might be interested that you can forward the job opportunity to.

This takes a lot of the hard sourcing work out of the job hunt and enables you to take a two-way approach to applying for a job, with double the chance of getting that elusive interview. Operating within the seven job boards as well as Linked In gives great coverage across the job market. As always, the bigger and more targeted your network, the more opportunity to apply direct to the hiring manager, (You may already be on their radar) or to ask an established contact to refer you.  The best way to get referrals is to build a network of people in target companies/sectors and engage with them before you need something. People are naturally curious about the people they engage with and will look at your profile, bio or blog first off. Get these right to create the best first impression.

I really enjoyed  doing the 30 second reviews of your resumes, and I hope you found my comments useful. Although this post has passed, I will review any I receive, so keep them coming.

The 30 Second Review

This week I’m switching from resumes to profiles. if your going to be applying for jobs through Job Insider, and it is a great application, then you are going to need your Linked In profile to create a great first impression. This week I will be doing 30 second reviews of your profile. (That’s how long a recruiter will look at it before moving on.) If you want your profile reviewing, post the link in comments, subscribe to the blog either by e-mail or RSS feed and I will post a review.

If you have a blog, I’m also featuring blogs and bloggers on my other blog, The Recruiting Unblog. Head over there, subscribe and post a link to your blog, I will do the rest!

Please let me know your thoughts and how you get on with Job Insider, be social in your search.

Bill

Links Mentioned In This Post:

Free Download For  Linked In Job Insider

The Recruiting Unblog (Blog #uncarnival)


Linked In Profiling

Get your picture right! don't be faceless

There has been a lot of talk around what Linked In actually is. Is it a glorified job board, a directory for sourcing or something more.

The reality is, it is what you make it.

Your Linked In profile should be the first thing you get right. It is your reference base, reflects what you are and is the place where you are most likely to be found.

My tips on getting your profile right:

1: Get your picture professional and memorable. I have the pointing arms and hands, but that’s because I’m a speaker and trainer. No Beach shots, cartoons or comedy faces. I advocate using the  same avatar in all of your social places for instant recognition from followers or fans.

2: Your top line leads the way in the search and comes up in the “People you might know” field. It is the first impression. If you are between jobs, (I dislike the term transition”), make it clear the type of role you are looking for by job title. Make it key-word rich. I have included the top 100 words recruiters search for from The Ladders.  Use high-ranking terms where they are relevent, and separate them by full stops or commas. (As in all bio’s)

3; Change your update every 2 – 3 days. This is where Linked In starts to get social, but remember that it is not Facebook, hence not the place for funnies or non-business related stuff. For ease of use I have linked twitter with Tweetdeck. I don’t include all the tweets, only my updates. You can update direct from Tweetdeck by adding the hashtag #in.

CAUTION: If you have set the twitter update option in Linked In, take #in out of  any retweets or they will appear as your update, hence the reason lots of bloggers add them to their tweets!

Your connections will get your updates and will comment on them. In particular, post positive comments about companies you have interviewed with, (don’t say the interviewer was rude and an idiot!). Many larger hiring companies use social media listening tools like Radian6 and will pick up on the positive or negative feedback. (This applies to all channels, not just Linked In.)

4: Use a popular key word in your current job title. Include all your past jobs and job titles. For websites, use all the links to connect with you at Facebook, your blog or other social places. Put your Twitter name in the twitter section.

5: For recommendations, don’t just recommend those that have recommended you. Think who can be authentic and will say more than a few words. If anyone tells you that you have done a good job, ask them to recommend you. Give your own recommendations only where they are deserved, and make your comments personal and original. Remember, your judgment could be weighed up on who you rate!

6: Keep your summary clear and to the point. Again, make it key word rich, and be clear at the top the type of post you are seeking. Get someone to review how well it reads.

Tomorrow I’m going to post on how you can be social on linked In, how to get the best out of groups (you should belong to all that you can, maximum 50), and the applications you should add to get the most from this channel. please post on areas you feel you want help or a viewpoint on, and subscibe to the blog.

Keep being social in your job search,

Bill

Links Listed:

Controlling Settings And Preferences On Your Account – Linked In

Settings For Photos On Linked In

Top 100 Keywords Recruiters Search On From The Ladders

Setting Options for Tweet Applications On Linked In

Tweetdeck.Com

Radian6